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Theological Ethics: Volume 1

Author: 
Helmut Thielicke (Author)
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Description

This first volume of Helmut Thielicke's important and influential ethics, presents the classical problems of Theological Ethics: the relationship of autonomous and Christian ethics, of secularism and faith, of dogmatics and ethics; ethical principles in the light of the Christian doctrines of creation and the fall; justification and sanctification; and ethical norms and the problem of natural law. As Paul Tillich accurately predicted in his review of Thielicke's work, it has become "a standard in ethical theology" and, as Paul Althaus observed, it is both profound and fully engaged in the concrete practice of Christian life.
ISBN: 
9780800662646
Price: 
$32.00
Release date: 
January 1, 1966
Pages: 
731
Width: 
6
Height: 
9

Endorsements

"Thielicke comes to grips with the dilemma at the heart of modern ethics: how we, in the absence of any commonly recognized authority, Christian or otherwise, can find trustworthy guidelines.... The echoes of Bonhoeffer are heard precisely in the conviction that moral decision can be made only in the world, in worldly conflict, and not in the security of institutions and sacred traditions."
— Robert Detweiler, Journal of the American Academy of Religion

"Thielicke attempts to demonstrate the ethical meaning of justification through all of its case forms in which it appears within the grammar of existence. For to him there can be no divorce between theology and ethics as 'a kind of intellectual desert.'"
— Henlee Barnette, Review and Expositor