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2 Corinthians 8 and 9: A Commentary on Two Administrative Letters of the Apostle Paul

Author: 
George W. MacRae S.J. (Editor) Hans Dieter Betz (Author)
Series: 
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Description

The series [Hermenia] is designed to be critical and historical commentary to the Bible without arbitrary limits in size or scope. It will utilize the full range of philological and historical tools, including textual criticism (often slighted in modern commentaries), the methods of the history of tradition (including genre and prosodic analysis), and the history of religion.

Hermenia is designed for the serious student of the Bible. It will make full use of ancient Semitic and classical languages; at the same time, English translations of all comparative materials – Greek, Latin, Canaanite, or Akkadian – will be supplied alongside the citation of the source in its original language. Insofar as possible, the aim is to provide the student or scholar with full critical discussion of each problem of interpretation and with the primary data upon which the discussion is based.

ISBN: 
9780800660147
Price: 
$39.00
Release date: 
January 1, 1985
Pages: 
180
Width: 
8.25
Height: 
9.25

Excerpts

In a fresh examination [of 2 Corinthians] what is needed first is a detailed and careful analysis of the chapters in order to find out whether they in fact can be related to letter categories known from other ancient epistolary literature, that is, whether their literary form, internal composition, argumentative rhetoric, and function can be shown to be that of independent epistolary fragments. The present study provides such an analysis of 2 Corinthians 8 and 9. This analysis is in most represents the first such attempt, but it is certainly not intended to be the last word on the subject. Sufficient evidence is provided to support the conclusions, so that quick reactions of mere agreement or disagreement, a mere embrace or indignation, will be avoided. The challenge to the serious students of the New Testament is to sustain a developed scientific argument.
-- from the Forward and Preface

Preface

The series [Hermeneia] is designed to be critical and historical commentary to the Bible without arbitrary limits in size or scope. It will utilize the full range of philological and historical tools, including textual criticism (often slighted in modern commentaries), the methods of the history of tradition (including genre and prosodic analysis), and the history of religion.

Hermeneia is designed for the serious student of the Bible. It will make full use of ancient Semitic and classical languages; at the same time, English translations of all comparative materials–Greek, Latin, Canaanite, or Akkadian–will be supplied alongside the citation of the source in its original language. Insofar as possible, the aim is to provide the student or scholar with full critical discussion of each problem of interpretation and with the primary data upon which the discussion is based.

[I]n a fresh examination [of 2 Corinthians] what is needed first is a detailed and careful analysis of the chapters in order to find out whether they in fact can be related to letter categories known from other ancient epistolary literature, that is, whether their literary form, internal composition, argumentative rhetoric, and function can be shown to be that of independent epistolary fragments. The present study provides such an analysis of 2 Corinthians 8 and 9. This analysis is in most respects the first such attempt, but it is certainly not intended to be the last word on the subject. Sufficient evidence is provided to support the conclusions, so that quick reactions of mere agreement or disagreement, a mere embrace or indignation, will be avoided. The challenge to the serious students of the New Testament is to sustain a developed scientific argument.
-- from the Preface

Table of Contents

Foreword to Hermeneia
Preface
Reference Codes
Note on the Edition
I: 2 Corinthians 8 and 9 in the History of New Testament Scholarship
II: 2 Corinthians 8, a Letter to the Church of Corinth
III: 2 Corinthians 9, a Letter to the Christians of Achaia
IV: The Literary Genre and Function
V. The Letters of Chapters 8 and 9
Bibliography
Indices
Designer's Notes