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The Hebrew Bible: A Brief Socio-Literary Introduction

Author: 
Norman K. Gottwald (Author) Rebecca J.Kruger Gaudino (Editor)
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Description

One of the pioneers of the socioliterary study of the Hebrew Bible introduces the beginning student to the social forces that shaped ancient Israel's history and scriptures. Norman K. Gottwald brings new light to every book of the Hebrew Bible, and to the older traditions and sources on which those writings in part depend, paying particular attention to the rise and fall of empires and the social revolution achieved in Israel's beginnings.

Rebecca J. Kruger Gaudino has prepared a clear and concise abridgement of Gottwald's classic textbook, now thoroughly updated and lavishly illustrated with maps, diagrams, and photos.

ISBN: 
9780800663087
Price: 
$55.00
Release date: 
October 28, 2008
Pages: 
412
Width: 
7
Height: 
9.25

Endorsements

" ... A significant survey of the OT, which combines the usual literary and theological evaluation with the social-historical approach.... The structure and format is excellent for students. Gottwald's work will become a standard text in OT research for years to come."
—Robert Gnuse, Loyola University

"Fair ... balanced ... judicious. [This volume] would make a good, balanced introduction for college and university students, and a useful reference work for scholars."
—J. J. M. Roberts, Theology Today