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Fall 2015

57-63 of 78
Mark McEntire (Author)
Release date: 
August 1, 2015

Mark McEntire continues the story begun in "Portraits of a Mature God," extending his narrative beyond the conclusion of the Hebrew Bible as Israel and Israel's God moved into the Hellenistic world.

Ted Peters (Author)
Release date: 
August 1, 2015

God--The World's Future has been a proven textbook in systematic theology for over twenty years. Thoroughly revised and expanded, this third edition is explicitly crafted to address our postmodern context and explains the whole body of Christian historical doctrine from a within a "proleptic" framework.

Maria Mayo (Author)
Release date: 
August 1, 2015

Maria Mayo questions the contemporary idealization of unconditional forgiveness in three areas of contemporary life: so-called Victim-Offender Mediation involving cases of criminal injury, the work of the Truth and Reconciliation Commission in post-apartheid South Africa, and the pastoral care of victims of domestic violence.

Release date: 
August 1, 2015

Strangers in This World brings together a consortium of scholars to reflect on the religious, political, anthropological, and social realities of immigration through the prism of the historical and theological resources, insights, and practices across an array of religious traditions.

Release date: 
August 1, 2015

Upending a longstanding consensus, Bruce W. Longenecker presents a wide variety of material artifacts to illustrate that Christians made use of the cross as a visual symbol of their faith long before Constantine appropriated it to consolidate his power in the fourth century.

Release date: 
August 1, 2015

Coming Full Circle provides a working constructive dogmatics in Native Christian theology. Drawing together leading scholars in the field, this volume seeks to encourage theologians to reconsider the rich possibilities present in the intersection between Native theory and practice and Christian theology and practice.

Release date: 
August 1, 2015

Scholars have long puzzled over the distinctive themes and sequence of John's narrative in contrast to the Synoptic Gospels. Brian Neil Peterson now offers a remarkable explanation for some of the most unusual features of John.

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