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Fall 2014

8-14 of 66
Release date: 
December 1, 2014

With attention to both liturgical interpretation and exegetical analysis, Lewis provides a unique preaching resource that will build biblical literacy by assisting both preachers and listeners in understanding John's Gospel as a whole.

Release date: 
December 1, 2014

Walter T. Wilson adopts an interdisciplinary approach to the healing narratives in the Gospel of Matthew, combining the familiar methods of form, redaction, and narrative criticisms with insights culled from medical anthropology, feminist theory, disability studies, and ancient archaeology.

Release date: 
December 1, 2014

Elaine A. Robinson introduces readers to the study of theology as a central task of all Christians and one that deserves careful and consistent attention. Following a lively examination of what theology is and how we do it, Robinson provides a basic map of the major doctrines of the faith and asks readers to consider their own beliefs at this important point in their journey.

Release date: 
December 1, 2014

The authors share their wisdom with seminarians and other readers seeking to deepen theological reflection and expand skills as ministry practitioners. This book is a companion journal for pilgrims on the way to becoming confident practitioners of ministry.

Daniel Inman (Author)
Release date: 
December 1, 2014

This book is the first historical account of theology's modern institutional origins in the United Kingdom. It explores how Oxford theology, from the beginnings of the Tractarian movement until the end of the Second World War, both influenced and responded to the reform of the university.

Joel M. Cruz (Author)
Release date: 
November 15, 2014

For the first time, this resource exists to help students and scholars understand the histories of Latin American Christianity. An ideal resource, this handbook is designed as an accompaniment to reading and research in the field.

Release date: 
November 1, 2014
In an era that oscillates regularly between nihilism and the erosion of moral vision, on the one hand, and pseudo-gnostic myths of self-apotheosis on the other, the classical Christian claim of human participation in the divine as the story of the transformation of human life takes on radical, counter-cultural color. The author performs a retrieval of the Christological vision of the unification of the divine and the human in the single subject of Jesus Christ.

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