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Women of the Reformation: From Spain to Scandinavia

Author: 
Roland H. Bainton (Author)
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Description

In this fascinating and concluding volume in his series on the contributions of women to the Reformation, celebrated historian Roland Bainton tells the stories of twenty-seven courageous figures — some famous, some less well-known — all ardently committed to religious reform during the restless years of the Reformation. Bainton's knack for combining an intimate knowledge of this historical period with a congenial and personal style of writing is once again on display in these memorable portraits of sixteenth-century women from Spain, Portugal, Scotland, England, Denmark, Norway, Poland, Sweden, Hungary, and Transylvania.
ISBN: 
9780800662486
Price: 
$21.00
Release date: 
January 1, 1977
Pages: 
240

Endorsements

"All the delightful features of the Bainton trademark appear: warm empathy with each person visited, the expert storyteller's verve shaped by the historian's zeal for accuracy, skillful interweaving of intimate personality sketches and panoramic historical analysis, evocative illustrations, lyrical sensitivity, and flashes of epigrammatic wit and the author's own personal chuckles."
— The Christian Century

"The accounts are instructive and tantalizing.... [These women] are visionaries and mystics; poets, translators, and authors; queens and courtiers; expounders of the Reformers' doctrines and those — like Teresa of Avila — who themselves undertook reforms but maintained fealty to the rule of the Roman Church.... Only a few of the women are likely to be known to non-specialists, and Bainton tells the stories well."
— Theology Today