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Women of the Reformation: In Germany and Italy

Author: 
Roland H. Bainton (Author)
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Description

In this first installment in celebrated historian Roland Bainton's Women of the Reformation trilogy, sixteen women who are usually lost behind familiar Reformation figures and events come to life. Extensively researched and vividly told, these are the stories of unsung reformers who courageously renounced religious vows, opened their homes to those fleeing religious persecution, and faced estrangement from their families in the cause of the Protestant Reformation in Germany and Italy.
ISBN: 
9780800662462
Price: 
$21.00
Release date: 
January 1, 1971
Pages: 
280

Endorsements

"Through Bainton's study of these women one discovers not only their aggressive activity on behalf of reform, but also the network of warm human relations that bound the reformers, both men and women, to one another."
— Church History

"Each of these biographies is interesting and presents a neglected dimension of the Reformation. The book is simply good reading."
— St. Luke's Journal of Theology

"[These] biographies may convey to clergy and laity ... a valuable sense that the Reformation was not just a masculine affair; moreover, that women have courageously defended their beliefs. And given the dearth of scholarly material, this book may be of some interest to those who wish to increase their knowledge of women's contributions to history."
— Union Seminary Quarterly Review