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The Travail of Nature: The Ambiguous Ecological Promise of Christian Theology

Author: 
H. Paul Santmire (Author)
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Description

The Travail of Nature shows that the theological tradition in the West is neither ecologically bankrupt, as some of its popular and scholarly critics have maintained, nor replete with immediately accessible, albeit long-forgotten, ecological riches hidden everywhere in its deeper vaults, as some contemporary Christians, who are profoundly troubled by the environmental crisis and other related concerns, might wistfully hope to find. This is why it is appropriate to speak of the ambiguous ecological promises of Christian theology.
ISBN: 
9780800618063
Price: 
$24.00
Release date: 
January 1, 1991
Pages: 
288
Width: 
9
Height: 
6

Endorsements

"At last we have a fair, historically responsible assessment of the view of nature in the tradition of Christian theology! The book is also an appeal for contemporary Christians to accent the themes or metaphors within the tradition that will allow them, in full responsibility to their heritage, to bring the church onto the side of ecological sensitivity."
—John B. Cobb Jr.
School of Theology Claremont


"This book represents a much-needed historical study of the attitude(s) within the Christian tradition toward nature."
—Langdon Gilkey
University of Chicago


Read how this book is discussed in "Arts & Books: Nature and grace" regarding the environment.
— Linda-Marie Delloff, The Lutheran February 2001