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Six Theories of Justice: Perspectives from Philosophical and Theological Ethics

Author: 
Karen Lebacqz (Author)
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Description

There may be no more urgent cry today than that of "justice" -- and no more frequent accusation than that of "injustice." But what is meant when these terms are used? Six Theories of Justice clarifies that question and offers major alternative answers. Dr. Lebacqz surveys three philosophical approaches to justice: John Stuart Mill's utilitarianism, the "contract" system of John Rawls, and the "entitlement" views of Robert Nozick. These are followed by analysis of three theological approaches: that of the National Conference of Catholic Bishops, of Reinhold Niebuhr, and of the liberation theologian Jose Porfirio Miranda. A comparison of the effectiveness of each approach in providing direction for facing and dealing with contemporary issues and situations adds to the usefulness of this volume. A lucid and well-structured introduction to recent thinking in social ethics.

ISBN: 
9780806622453
Price: 
$16.99
Release date: 
January 1, 1987
Pages: 
160
Width: 
8.38
Height: 
5.75

Table of Contents

Introduction

1. The Utilitarian Challenge: John Stuart Mill

2. A Contract Response: John Rawls

3. An Entitlement Alternative: Robert Nozick

4. A Catholic Response: The National Conference of Catholic Bishops

5. A Protestant Alternative: Reinhold Niebuhr

6. A Liberation Challenge: Jose Porfirio Miranda

Conclusion

Notes

Index