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The Rhetoric of Jesus in the Gospel of Mark

Author: 
David M. Young (Author) Michael Strickland (Author)
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Description

Young and Strickland analyze the four largest discourses of Jesus in Mark in the context of Greco-Roman rhetoric in an attempt to hear them as a first-century audience would have heard them. Their analysis uncovers how the discourses are constructed; what issues each discourse seeks to treat; how the argumentation, arrangement, and style of each discourse contributes to its overall purpose; and how the discourse fits into the overall narrative context of the Gospel. The authors demonstrate that, contrary to what some historical critics have suggested, first-century audiences of Mark would have found the discourses of Jesus unified, well-integrated, and persuasive. They also show how these speeches of the Markan Jesus contribute to Mark’s overall narrative accomplishments.

ISBN: 
9781506433356
Price: 
$79.00
ISBN: 
9781506438474
Release date: 
November 15, 2017
Pages: 
400
Width: 
6
Height: 
9

Table of Contents

Introduction

1. The Discourses of Jesus since Form Criticism

2. The Discourses of Jesus as Rhetoric

3. Satan Cannot Cast Out Satan (Mark 3:22–30)

4. Whoever Has Ears Had Better Listen! (Mark 4:1–34)

5. What Defiles a Person? (Mark 6:53–7:23)

6. The Marvel of the Coming Son of Man (Mark 11:27–13:37)

Conclusion

Appendix: A Brief History of Greco-Roman Rhetoric

Glossary of Select Rhetorical Terms

Bibliography

Index

Endorsements

I highly recommend this book to those who wish an especially helpful introduction to contemporary Markan studies

"This book is an important introduction to Gospel studies in the twentieth century, especially the Gospel of Mark, with a spotlight on international Markan scholarship. In the last century scholars moved from a concentrated interest in the historical Jesus to form criticism with its search for chronological textual layers; to redaction criticism which features the theological predilections of the authors; to rhetorical and narrative criticism in which the rhetorical power of discourses in the Gospel is at stake. The main contribution of this work is the analysis of four of these segments viewed from the perspective of ancient rhetoric. An excellent short history of ancient rhetoric may be found in an appendix.  I highly recommend this book to those who wish an especially helpful introduction to contemporary Markan studies along with a modus operandi for criticism based upon the dictates of ancient rhetoric."

Thomas H. Olbricht | Pepperdine University

Highly recommended.

"Of the rhetorical analysis of Mark's Gospel, I know of no finer work than that of David Young's on that earliest of Christian biographies of Jesus. This analysis is both clear and compelling, and shows that a rhetorical analysis of Mark's chreiae and other aspects of his Gospel are not merely useful but necessary to fully understand Mark's portrait of Jesus. Highly recommended."

Ben Witherington, III | Amos Professor of NT for Doctoral Studies, Asbury Theological Seminary

Young and Strickland have provided a wonderful gift for both experts and novices in ancient rhetoric

"Young and Strickland have provided a wonderful gift for both experts and novices in ancient rhetoric. Experts will appreciate the fresh and compelling reading of the four largest discourses in Mark in light of Greco-Roman rhetorical conventions. Non-experts will discover an accessible introduction to rhetorical criticism of the New Testament as well as explanations for aspects of Mark's discourses that seem foreign to modern readers. Both will be reminded that the writer of Mark was not a simple collector or editor of traditions about Jesus but rather a skilled writer who was obviously persuasive to the first-century audience."

Mark Black | Hazelip School of Theology, Lipscomb University

Young and Strickland ably apply the insights of rhetorical criticism to Mark’s Gospel

"Having made a case for the pervasiveness of rhetorical skills and awareness throughout the 1st century Mediterranean population, Young and Strickland then ably apply the insights of rhetorical criticism to Mark’s Gospel. As they do so they demonstrate that the Second Evangelist was hardly an inept gatherer of traditional materials as historical critics have usually claimed. Rather, their rhetorical analysis shows that this gospel writer created a careful, thoughtful, and rhetorically persuasive presentation of the one she or he called Jesus the Christ the Son of God."

 

Mitzi Minor | Memphis Theological Seminary