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The Gift of Love

The Gift of Love: Augustine, Jean-Luc Marion, and the Trinity

Author: 
Andrew Staron (Author)
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Description

The Gift of Love explores the intelligibility of Augustine’s claim that we come to know and encounter God in and through our love.

Building upon the discoveries of recent scholarship, Andrew Staron reads Augustine's De Trinitate not as presenting the Trinity as a concept to be grasped, but rather as a rational study of the limits of theological language and the possibility of coming to know the Trinity because of those limits. Human dependence on God's initiative indicates that the Trinitarian God of love is knowable only through attention to how God's self-revelation transforms and saves us. Therefore, to see God, one seeks to mark love's formative activity within the heart. Jean-Luc Marion's rigorous description of the gift of love offers to Augustine's theology a phenomenological texture by which the Trinitarian love given in revelation might be made incarnate in one's life. The Gift of Love presents a reason for hope that while coming to know "the Trinity that God is" might be impossible for human beings, it is made possible by God's antecedent gift of love, given in the missions Son and Holy Spirit, and iconically received in the particularity of one’s own love.

 

ISBN: 
9781506423401
Price: 
$79.00
ISBN: 
9781506416717
Release date: 
February 1, 2017
Pages: 
438
Width: 
6
Height: 
9

Emerging Scholars:

Contents

Introduction

Part I: A Reading of De Trinitate
1. Language and Conversion within the Limits of De Trinitate
2. Books I–IV: The Revelation of God in Salvation History
3. Books V–VII: Naming God
4. Books VIII–XV: The Gift of Love to the Image of God
Conclusion to Part I

Part II: Jean-Luc Marion and the Question of the Unconditioned God
5. [For]giving Theology Its Groundlessness
6. Marking Excess: The Saturated Phenomenon
7. The Impossible Gift
8. A Love that Bears All Things
9. Appraising the Gift of Love
Conclusion to Part II

Part III: Given in Worship
10. A Beginning Given in Advance
11. Praising the Trinity that God Is
Conclusion to Part III

Bibliography
Index

Endorsements

A remarkable performance!

The Gift of Love shows us, in three large steps, how to read Augustine's great book De Trinitate. After a thorough examination of the text, we pass to an equally detailed consideration of Jean-Luc Marion's phenomenology of givenness, and then, at last, Augustine's meaning becomes clearer than before. We cannot receive the triune God in terms of our concepts; rather, we must allow ourselves to receive Him as He gives himself, and in so doing be transformed in ways we cannot anticipate and control. A remarkable performance!"

Kevin Hart | University of Virginia

An erudite and important study

"This is a fine contribution to the central contemporary theological conversation on thinking the Trinitarian God today. Staron provides his own original contribution through a sustained and critical conversation with Augustine and Jean-Luc Marion. An erudite and important study."

David Tracy | University of Chicago Divinity School

Crystal clear and balanced analysis

"While solidly built on previous research, Staron’s monograph decisively refreshes the interpretation of Augustine’s De Trinitate. His crystal clear and balanced analysis captures the heart of key counterintuitive aspects of the De Trinitate, especially with regards to the primacy of love and grace in the knowledge of God, and is a model of philosophical theology."

Luigi Gioia | University of Cambridge