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Galilee in the Late Second Temple and Mishnaic Periods, Volume 2

Galilee in the Late Second Temple and Mishnaic Periods, Volume 2: The Archaeological Record from Cities, Towns, and Villages

Author: 
David A. Fiensy (Editor) James Riley Strange (Editor)
Collection: 
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Description

This second of two volumes on Galilee in the Late Second Temple and Mishnaic Periods focuses on the site excavations of towns and villages and what these excavations may tell us about the history of settlement in this important period. The important site at Sepphoris is treated with four short articles, while the rest of the articles focus on a single site and include site plans, diagrams, maps, photographs of artifacts and structures, and extensive bibliographic listings.

The articles in the volume have been written by an international group of experts on Galilee in this period: Christians, Jews, and secular scholars, many of whom are also regular participants in the twenty site excavations featured in the volume.

The volume also features detailed maps of Galilee, a gallery of color images, timelines related to the period, and helpful indices. Together with Volume 1: Life, Culture, and Society, this volume provides the latest word of these topics for the expert and nonexpert alike.

ISBN: 
9781451467420
Price: 
$69.00
ISBN: 
9781506401959
Release date: 
November 1, 2015
Pages: 
502
Width: 
7
Height: 
9.25

Endorsements

With their unprecedented wealth of detail—literary as well as material—, and thanks to ample maps, plans and references, Galilee Volume 2 now provides the ideal supplement to Galilee Volume 1. . .

"From ‘rural hinterland’ to a thriving, culturally diverse and vibrant region! No other area of the Roman world, perhaps, has undergone such a deep transformation in scholarly assessment than Galilee. And rightly so: Despite all its special problems, Galilee in many ways is a model for understanding the relationship between indigenous and foreign cultures and internal social tensions and diversities in the Hellenistic and Roman East. With their unprecedented wealth of detail—literary as well as material—, and thanks to ample maps, plans and references, Galilee Volume 2 now provides the ideal supplement to Galilee Volume 1. Sites like Magdala, Capernaum or Tiberias, and many others, are described and often reassessed according to the latest archaeological evidence. These two books truly mark a new era of Galilean studies! Nobody interested in the history and culture of ancient Judaism, early Christianity, archaeology or ancient history can afford to miss these two books."
 

—Jürgen K. Zangenberg | Leiden University

A 'who's who' of the key archaeologists and other leading scholars. . .

"This excellent volume on the archaeological sites in Galilee provides the underpinnings for the topically arranged Galilee Volume 1. A 'who's who' of the key archaeologists and other leading scholars take the reader through all the main Galilean sites for which well-documented archaeological evidence is currently available. This book will be a basic resource for study of the context of Galilean Judaism and of the historical Jesus and his early followers."

 

—Peter Oakes | University of Manchester

This is essential reading for the traveler and for the student of the Second Temple Period, New Testament, and Rabbinic Judaism.

This second volume of a two-volume work on Galilee consists of a series of essays on particular archaeological sites in Galilee written by scholars intimately acquainted with the details of the sites (for example, Eric and Carol Myers, Andrea Berlin, James Strange). It is highly detailed, but it is not written above the level of the motivated general reader. The running text is supported lavishly by b/w photographs, site maps, drawings of specific remains, and even a number of reconstructions.

I would especially recommend this book for the person who intends to visit any number of these sites, and quite a few are typically included in “Holy Land Tours.” For such purposes, the essays on Capernaum, Nazareth, and Tiberias would be especially important, as would the essays on two of the sites identified with the biblical Cana (Khirbet Qana and Karm er-Ras). Reading these essays in advance of a site visit will help the tourist (or "pilgrim") know what to look for (tour guides are not always attuned to what is most relevant for those interested in the Hellenistic- and Roman-period occupation of a site) and how to interpret often scant remains (both those featured by a tour guide and those over which he or she might skip). Given the considerable investment of time and resources involved making such a trip, the cost and discipline of reading these chapters prior to visiting will return that smaller investment many times over.

While Sepphoris (modern Zipori) is not typically on a tour’s itinerary, the four essays dedicated to this single site attest to its importance as a Roman city in the heart of Galilee and suggest that, despite its non-appearance in the pages of the New Testament, it is nevertheless a “must see” site. The adventuresome traveler could also benefit from the essays on Bethsaida and Magdala, two important biblical sites that rarely make it onto basic itineraries (the former because of the scant remains, though the essay in this book brings those architectural footprints to three-dimensional life; the latter because it is not technically featured in a biblical narrative, though the first-century archaeological remains uncovered at the site are rich and abundant). Indeed, this book has altered my own itinerary for my forthcoming trip to Israel by introducing me to what could be found at certain sites that I would never have thought to visit otherwise.

The remaining essays are written equally well, though with less obvious relevance for the tourist or the student of the New Testament. A number focus specifically on excavations of late Roman/early Byzantine synagogues; two focus on sites of major importance for the First Jewish Revolt (Jotapata, the site of Josephus’s last stand and surrender, and Kedesh).

This is essential reading for the traveler and for the student of the Second Temple Period, New Testament, and Rabbinic Judaism."

David A. deSilva | Ashland Theological Seminary