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An Apocryphal God: Beyond Divine Maturity

Author: 
Mark McEntire (Author)
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Description

In Portraits of a Mature God, Mark McEntire traced the narrative development of the divine character in the Old Testament, placing the God portrayed at the end of that long story at the center of theological discussion. He showed that Israel’s understanding of God had developed into a complex, multipurpose being who could work within a new reality, a world that included a semiautonomous province of Yehud and a burgeoning Mesopotamian-Mediterranean world in which the Jewish people lived and moved in a growing diversity of ways.

Now, McEntire continues that story beyond the narrative end of the Hebrew Bible as Israel and Israel’s God moved into the Hellenistic world. The “narrative” McEntire perceives in the apocryphal literature describes a God protecting and guiding the scattered and persecuted, a God responding to suffering in revolt, and a God disclosing mysteries, yet also hidden in the symbolism of dreams and visions. McEntire here provides a coherent and compelling account of theological perspectives in the apocryphal writings and beyond.

ISBN: 
9781451470352
Price: 
$39.00
Release date: 
August 1, 2015
Pages: 
296
Width: 
6
Height: 
9

Endorsements

“In An Apocryphal God, Mark McEntire explores the kind of divine characterization found in the Jewish Literature of the last three centuries before the Common Era.  The considerable diversity of literature produced during that period, coupled with the relative obscurity of the material to the general public today, makes such a project appear daunting at best.  While attentive to historical and social dimensions of the texts, McEntire hones in on the narrative contours of each text that can open up a rich theological vein from which to mine.  McEntire demonstrates well his capacity for serious and critical theological reflection as he mines those veins to their fullest.  For those seeking quintessential models of biblical and theological reflection, McEntire’s An Apocryphal God will not disappoint.” 
—W. Dennis Tucker, Jr.
Baylor University

Reviews

Review in Bible Today