You are here

Spring 2016

15-21 of 48
Release date: 
June 1, 2016

With great clarity and insight, James M. Estes illuminates Luther’s call to secular authorities to help with the reform of the church in this important 1520 treatise. To combat Rome’s intransigent opposition to reform of any sort, Luther appealed to secular rulers to intervene and clear the way for ecclesiastical reform.

Release date: 
June 1, 2016

With great detail, Kirsi I. Stjerna introduces and annotates Luther’s Large Catechism, in which the reformer set out to offer a new compass for religious life. He believed all Christian people—laity and clergy—needed a guide to comprehend the basic biblical, creedal, and sacramental teachings.

Kirsi I. Stjerna (Editor) Volker Leppin (Editor)
Release date: 
June 1, 2016

In autumn 1525, Luther wrote The Bondage of the Will as a response to humanist and theologian Erasmus of Rotterdam, who had criticized Luther’s teachings in the diatribe On Free Will. Luther’s argument on the matter of the bound and free will poses a challenge and an invitation for constructive contemporary theology.

A. Andrew Das (Author)
Release date: 
June 1, 2016

Much recent scholarship on Paul has searched for implicit narratives behind Paul's scriptural allusions. A. Andrew Das reviews six proposals for "grand thematic narratives" behind the logic of Galatians: the covenant; the influx of nations to Zion; Isaac's near sacrifice; the Spirit as cloud in the wilderness; the Exodus; and the imperial cult. Das weighs each of these proposals exegetically and finds them wanting, examples of what Samuel Sandmel famously labeled "parallelomania." Das reflects on the risks of seeking comprehensive stories behind Paul's letters and offers a path forward. 

Release date: 
May 3, 2016

What is the true story of God and humankind, and how does that story become a saving story? These are pivotal questions that constitute the narratives Christians tell about themselves, their values, and how the Christian life is to be lived. In shaping those stories into a coherent, intelligible framework that provides comprehensive meaning, soteriology—the doctrine of redemption—developed as a keystone to Christian consciousness. This study investigates that development of the soteriological tradition, from its beginning in the early church to medieval, Reformation, and modern accounts.

Stephen Finlan (Author)
Release date: 
May 1, 2016

Stephen Finlan surveys sacrifice and atonement and what they may reveal about patterns of injury, guilt, shame, and appeasement. Early chapters examine the language in both testaments of purity and the “scapegoat,” and of payment, obligation, reciprocity, and redemption. Later chapters review theories of the origins of atonement thinking in fear and traumatic childhood experience, in ambivalent attachment, and in “poisonous pedagogy.” The theories of Sandor Rado, Erik Erikson, and Alice Miller are examined, then Finlan draws conclusions about the moral appropriation or rejection of atonement metaphors. 

Release date: 
May 1, 2016

What was Martin Luther King Jr. really like? In this groundbreaking volume, Lewis V. Baldwin answers this question by focusing on the man himself. Drawing on the testimonies of friends, family, and closest associates, this volume adds much-needed biographical background to the discussion, as Baldwin looks beyond all of the mythic, messianic, and iconic images to treat King in terms of his fundamental and vivid humanness.

Pages