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Release date: 
December 1, 2017

Christians have traditionally claimed that humans are created in the image of God (imago Dei), but they have consistently defined that image in ways that exclude people from full humanity. The most well-known definition locates the image in the rational soul, which is constructed in such a way that women, children, and many persons with disabilities are found deficient. Body Parts claims the importance of embodiment, difference, and limitation—not only as descriptions of the human condition but also as part of the imago Dei itself.

Erik Ranstrom (Author) Bob Robinson (Author)
Release date: 
December 1, 2017

Since his death in 2010, there has been continuing and growing interest in the life, vision, and thought of the late Spanish-Indian mystical theologian Raimon Panikkar. This ...

Release date: 
December 1, 2017

The Christian church has consistently confessed that the triune God of the gospel is simple and therefore beyond composition. The various divine attributes do not ...

Richard Beck (Author)
Release date: 
November 1, 2017

When Richard Beck first led a Bible study at a maximum security prison, he went to meet God. His own faith was flagging, but Beck still believed the promise of Matthew 25, that when we visit the prisoner, we visit Jesus.

With his signature combination of biblical reflection, theological reasoning, and psychological insight, Beck shows how God always meets us in the marginalized and the refugee. God comes to us in the poor, the crippled, the smelly. 

Release date: 
November 1, 2017

Helmut Gollwitzer was a direct heir of the theological legacy of the great Protestant theologian Karl Barth. Yet, Gollwitzer’s work is perhaps least appreciated and ...

Release date: 
November 1, 2017

Wolfhart Pannenberg is one of the most important theologians of the second half of the twentieth century. This volume offers the first full historical and ...

Release date: 
November 1, 2017

Thomas G. Weinandy, OFM, Cap., and Daniel A. Keating introduce readers to one the key thinkers of the fourth century and the chief architect of Christian doctrine: Athanasius. The authors carefully illuminate Athanasius’s crucial text Against the Arians, unfolding the Trinitarian and incarnation framework of Athanasius’s paramount concern (soteriology), and providing, in the second part, a robust map of the reception and influence of Athanasius’s thought—from its immediate impact on the late fourth and fifth centuries (in the Cappadocians and Cyril) to its significance in the Eastern and Western traditions and its reception in contemporary thought.

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