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Philosophical

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Neil Ormerod (Author)
Release date: 
September 1, 2017

The twentieth century witnessed considerable debate over the question of the possibility of a "Christian philosophy." Two major figures of that revival were Étienne Gilson and Bernard Lonergan, both of whom read Aquinas in quite different ways on key questions. Nonetheless, this work brings these two authors into conversation. Debates continue in the twenty-first century, but the context has shifted, with Radical Orthodoxy and new atheism standing at opposite ends on the relationship between philosophy and theology. This work will demonstrate how the two thinkers, Gilson and Lonergan, may still contribute to a better understanding of this relationship and so shed light on contemporary issues.

Peter Kline (Author)
Release date: 
September 1, 2017

The main contention of this book is that Kierkegaard’s apophaticism is an ethical-religious difficulty, concerning itself with the "whylessness" of existence. This is a theme that Kierkegaard inherits from the philosophical and theological traditions stemming from Meister Eckhart.

The book examines Kierkegaard’s apophaticism with reference to five themes: indirect communication, God, faith, hope, and love. Across these themes, the aim is to lend voice to "the unruly energy of the unsayable" and, in doing so, let Kierkegaard’s theological, spiritual, and philosophical provocation remain a living one for us today.

Andrew Hayes (Author)
Release date: 
April 1, 2017

In a period where Christianity was only beginning to form a definitive identity, Marcion played a remarkable and generative role. Andrew Hayes takes the measure of his ...

Timothy Stanley (Author)
Release date: 
February 1, 2017

In Writing Faith, Timothy Stanley provides a novel investigation into Jacques Derrida's unanswered question concerning the mediatic nature of Christianity. There, the relationship between writing and faith comes into sharper focus. 

Release date: 
January 1, 2017

The Captivation of the Will provocatively revisits a perennial topic of controversy: human free will. Highly esteemed Lutheran thinker Gerhard O. Forde cuts to the heart of the subject by reexamining the famous debate on the will between Luther and Erasmus. Following a substantial introduction by James A. Nestingen that brings to life the historical background of the debate, Forde thoroughly explores Luther's "Bondage of the Will" and the dispute between Erasmus and Luther that it reflects. 

Berndt Hamm (Author)
Release date: 
January 1, 2017

The development of Martin Luther's thought has commanded much scholarly attention because of the Reformation and its remarkable effects on the history of Christianity in the West. But much of that scholarship has been so enthralled by certain later debates that it has practically ignored and even distorted the context in and against which Luther's thought developed. In The Early Luther Berndt Hamm, armed with expertise both in late-medieval intellectual life and in Luther, presents new perspectives that leave old debates behind. 

Robert Kolb (Author)
Release date: 
January 1, 2017

Galvanized by Erasmus' teaching on free will, Martin Luther wrote De servo arbitrio, or The Bondage of the Will, insisting that the sinful human will could not turn itself to God. In this first study to investigate the sixteenth-century reception of De servo, Robert Kolb unpacks Luther's theology and recounts his followers' ensuing disputes until their resolution in the Lutheran churches' 1577 Formula of Concord. 

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