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Fall 2016

15-21 of 53
Release date: 
November 1, 2016

Belief in the doctrine of Original Sin is firmly held by many Christians, but it turns out that it’s not necessarily biblical. Further, argues Danielle Shroyer, it’s bad for people and bad for the church. In Original Blessing, Shroyer shows not only how we got it wrong, but how we can put sin back in its rightful place: in a broader context of redemption and the blessing of humanity’s creation in the image of God.

Release date: 
November 1, 2016

A Generous Symphony offers an appraisal of Balthasar’s literary achievement and explicates his literary criticism as a distinctive theology of revelation.

Paula Gooder (Author)
Release date: 
November 1, 2016

There is a lurking Neo-Platonism in Christian thinking today. It assumes that there is a gaping hole between our inner and our outer selves and that the soul is to be seen as "good" while the body is "bad." 

Gooder here explores six key concepts, especially from the writings of Paul, before exploring their implications for how we think and speak about our spirituality today.

Anders Runesson (Author)
Release date: 
October 1, 2016

Anders Runesson sets out to show, through careful study of Matthew's composition and comparison with contemporary Jewish literature, that the theme of divine judgment plays very different and distinct roles regarding diverse groups of Jews (including Jesus' disciples) and non-Jews in this Gospel. 

Release date: 
October 1, 2016

This volume argues that Bonhoeffer’s early work, particularly his Christocentric anthropology, grounds his later expressed commitments to responsibility and faithfulness in a “world come of age."

Gary Yamasaki (Author)
Release date: 
October 1, 2016

In this volume, Gary Yamasaki develops an innovative approach to biblical narrative, exploring the way stories are treated in filmmaking, and using that as a ...

Release date: 
October 1, 2016

For nearly thirty years, Luther the Reformer has been the standard Luther biography. Fair, insightful, and detailed without being overwhelming, Kittelson was able to negotiate a “middle way” that presented a more complete chronological picture of Luther than many had yet portrayed. For this revised edition, Hans H. Wiersma has made an outstanding text even better. The research is updated, and the text is revised throughout, with images, bibliographies, and timelines to enhance the experience. It’s a great volume, greatly improved.

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