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Fall 2014

36-42 of 66
Release date: 
October 1, 2014

Engagement with primary sources is an essential part of effective teaching and learning in the church history or theology course. And yet, pulling together and distilling the right readings can be challenging. In this all-new primary-source anthology, Keith D. Stanglin has done the heavy lifting for a new generation of classrooms. Stanglin has edited and introduced over 100 selections to create a reader that orients students to the ebb and flow of thought that moves out from the pre-Reformation period.

Release date: 
October 1, 2014

Ben Witherington III offers an extensive, cross-cultural survey of the broader expressions of prophecy in its ancient Mediterranean context, beginning with Mari, moving to biblical figures not often regarded as prophets and to the apocalyptic seer in postexilic prophecy, showing that no single pattern describes all prophetic figures. The consequence is that different aspects of Jesus's activity touch upon prophetic predecessors.

Release date: 
October 1, 2014

This commentary on the New Testament presents a balanced synthesis of current scholarship, enabling readers to interpret Scripture for a complex and pluralistic world. The result is a commentary that is comprehensive and useful for preaching, teaching, and research.

Release date: 
September 15, 2014

Applying a comprehensive theory of character to the Gospel of John, Cornelis Bennema provides a fresh analysis of both the characters and their responses to Jesus.

Sung-Sup Kim (Author)
Release date: 
September 1, 2014
Sung-Sup Kim here argues that while Barth advances the discussion on the Reformed readings of the doctrine of providence in key ways, his reading of Calvin in particular is significantly hampered by his running challenge to Schleiermacher.
Michael W. Foss (Author)
Release date: 
September 1, 2014
Dr. Foss here offers a compelling introduction to the new context in which we lead our congregations and the personal and congregational strategies that will offer a way forward.
Release date: 
September 1, 2014

In Dialectical Theology and Jacques Ellul, Jacob E. Van Vleet argues that the work of Jacques Ellul is frequently misread on account of inattention to the theological underpinning that governs Ellul's thought. In a penetrating analysis, Van Vleet provides a substantive account of the theological structure of Ellul's work.

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