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Fall 2014

1-7 of 66
Release date: 
January 15, 2015
Here Nathan Loewen moves beyond surface questions about technology in the classroom to a problem best addressed by educators in bricks-and-mortar institutions: if students are social learners, how do we teach in a way that promotes actual dialogue for learning?
Myles Werntz (Author)
Release date: 
December 1, 2014
Covering several great Christian thinkers, this book explores how each theologians' advocacy for nonviolent resistance depends deeply upon the ecclesiology out of which it comes.
Release date: 
December 1, 2014
In an accessible account, the author narrates the doctrine of grace as directed towards and explained by the fact that God has destined humans to spend eternity in communion with the Triune creator.
Release date: 
December 1, 2014
Nearly twenty-five years ago, John Milbank inaugurated Radical Orthodoxy, one of the most significant and influential theological movements of the last two decades. This volume conducts a comprehensive examination and critical analysis of Radical Orthodoxy's use and interpretation of John Duns Scotus.
Release date: 
December 1, 2014

The authors share their wisdom with seminarians and other readers seeking to deepen theological reflection and expand skills as ministry practitioners. This book is a companion journal for pilgrims on the way to becoming confident practitioners of ministry.

Daniel Inman (Author)
Release date: 
December 1, 2014

This book is the first historical account of theology's modern institutional origins in the United Kingdom. It explores how Oxford theology, from the beginnings of the Tractarian movement until the end of the Second World War, both influenced and responded to the reform of the university.

David J. Luy (Author)
Release date: 
December 1, 2014

This work creates the conditions necessary for an alternative appropriation of Luther's Christological legacy. By re-specifying certain key aspects of Luther's Christological commitments, Luy provides a careful reassessment of how Luther?s theology can make a contribution within ongoing attempts to adequately conceptualize divine immanence.

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