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Christian History

57-63 of 386
John T. Noble (Author)
Release date: 
May 1, 2016

Hagar and Ishmael are portrayed in ambivalent ways: dispossessed, yet protected; abandoned, yet given promises that rival those of the covenant with Abraham. John T. Noble argues that conventional characterizations of the Priestly writers' theology have failed to take into account the significance of these two "non-chosen" figures. Noble carefully examines their roles and depictions in Genesis and concludes that Ishmael is a key figure whose ambiguous status requires a rethinking of the goals and values of the Priestly work. 

Ben C. Blackwell (Editor) John K. Goodrich (Editor) Jason Maston (Editor)
Release date: 
May 1, 2016

Paul and the Apocalyptic Imagination brings together eminent Pauline scholars from diverse perspectives, along with experts of Second Temple Judaism, Hellenistic philosophy, patristics, and modern theology, to explore the contours of the current debate. Contributors discuss what apocalypticism, and an "apocalyptic Paul," have meant at different times; examine different aspects of Paul's thought and practice; and show how different implicit understandings of apocalypticism shape different contemporary presentations of the apostle’s significance.

Release date: 
May 1, 2016

Archaeologists have disputed the scarce evidence claimed for the presence of Christians in Pompeii before the catastrophic eruption of Mount Vesuvius in 79 CE. Now, Bruce W. Longenecker reviews that evidence in comparison with other possible data of first-century Christian presence elsewhere in the Mediterranean and reaches the conclusion that there were indeed Christians living in the doomed city. The Crosses of Pompeii presents an elegant case for their presence, with photographic illustration of the available archaeological evidence. 

Release date: 
May 1, 2016

Engaging Bonhoeffer documents the extraordinary impact of Dietrich Bonhoeffer’s life and writing on later thought. Despite his lasting legacy, little substantial scholarship has been conducted in this area. In this magisterial collection, leading international scholars fill this striking gap and critically demonstrate the ways in which Bonhoeffer has been one of the most inspirational writers of the twentieth century. In addition to shedding light on the different trajectories that Bonhoeffer’s work may forge, Engaging Bonhoeffer offers a critical window through which to view the ideas of many leading theological voices.

Release date: 
May 1, 2016

What was Martin Luther King Jr. really like? In this groundbreaking volume, Lewis V. Baldwin answers this question by focusing on the man himself. Drawing on the testimonies of friends, family, and closest associates, this volume adds much-needed biographical background to the discussion, as Baldwin looks beyond all of the mythic, messianic, and iconic images to treat King in terms of his fundamental and vivid humanness.

Jared Ortiz (Author)
Release date: 
April 1, 2016

Challenging the common notion that Augustine’s Confessions lacks literary unity, “You Made Us for Yourself” approaches the Confessions in light of what Augustine himself would have considered most fundamental: creation, understood in a broad sense. Creation, for Augustine, is an epiphany, a light which reveals who God and man are. It is, Ortiz argues, the light within which Augustine wrote the Confessions and can account for the often despaired of meaning, structure, and unity of the Confessions

Paul Hyoshin Kim (Author) Daniel L. Migliore (Author of the Foreword)
Release date: 
April 1, 2016

Many people look to the 1970s and 1980s to find the cause of the rapid growth of Christianity in Korea. But to understand the real story behind the growth of the Korean church, we need to rediscover the story of the American missionary enterprises of the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries. There, we will learn how the story of the “American Christ” came to Korea and gradually became a part of the Korean people’s story. After the missions, he is no longer the American Christ, but Jesus of Korea.

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