You are here

Christian History

50-56 of 389
Release date: 
July 1, 2016

Since some of the most important Catholic Enlighteners lived in Germany, this book concentrates on their endeavors, but also frequently points to other European players. Only an unpolemical historical assessment of the Catholic Enlightenment can help us to get out of the current gridlock of interpreting Vatican II: was there a break with tradition, or was there continuity? 

Release date: 
July 1, 2016

This study presents the Lutheran Confessions as a valuable partner for ministry in twenty-first-century contexts, interpreting these teachings for those who want to learn more about this branch of the Reformation. 

James R. Gordon (Author)
Release date: 
July 1, 2016

The Holy One in Our Midst: An Essay on the Flesh of Christ aims to defend the doctrine of the extra Calvinisticum—the doctrine that maintains the Son of God was not restricted to the flesh of Christ during the incarnation. . . 

Release date: 
June 15, 2016

In his The Babylonian Captivity of the Church, Martin Luther set forth a reconsideration of the sacramental Christian life that centered on the word. His thesis is that the papacy had distorted the sacraments with its own traditions and regulations, transforming them into a system of control and coercion.

Release date: 
June 1, 2016

With great detail, Kirsi I. Stjerna introduces and annotates Luther’s Large Catechism, in which the reformer set out to offer a new compass for religious life. He believed all Christian people—laity and clergy—needed a guide to comprehend the basic biblical, creedal, and sacramental teachings.

Release date: 
June 1, 2016

With great clarity and insight, James M. Estes illuminates Luther’s call to secular authorities to help with the reform of the church in this important 1520 treatise. To combat Rome’s intransigent opposition to reform of any sort, Luther appealed to secular rulers to intervene and clear the way for ecclesiastical reform.

Kirsi I. Stjerna (Editor) Volker Leppin (Editor)
Release date: 
June 1, 2016

In autumn 1525, Luther wrote The Bondage of the Will as a response to humanist and theologian Erasmus of Rotterdam, who had criticized Luther’s teachings in the diatribe On Free Will. Luther’s argument on the matter of the bound and free will poses a challenge and an invitation for constructive contemporary theology.

Pages