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Reformation

29-35 of 126
Release date: 
June 15, 2016

In his The Babylonian Captivity of the Church, Martin Luther set forth a reconsideration of the sacramental Christian life that centered on the word. His thesis is that the papacy had distorted the sacraments with its own traditions and regulations, transforming them into a system of control and coercion.

Release date: 
June 1, 2016

Timothy J. Wengert shows Luther’s Treatise on Good Works to be one of the clearest introductions to Luther’s reforming work and theology. Luther’s goal was to commend a new, down-to-earth piety to all Christians through a radically different meaning of good works that would transform the way believers practiced their faith.

Release date: 
June 1, 2016

Timothy J. Wengert skillfully sheds light on Luther’s popular treatise. As controversy concerning his writings grew, Luther wrote a reconciliation-minded letter to Pope Leo X (1475–1521). To this letter he appended a nonpolemical tract describing the heart of his beliefs, The Freedom of a Christian.

Release date: 
June 1, 2016

With great detail, Kirsi I. Stjerna introduces and annotates Luther’s Large Catechism, in which the reformer set out to offer a new compass for religious life. He believed all Christian people—laity and clergy—needed a guide to comprehend the basic biblical, creedal, and sacramental teachings.

Release date: 
June 1, 2016

With great clarity and insight, James M. Estes illuminates Luther’s call to secular authorities to help with the reform of the church in this important 1520 treatise. To combat Rome’s intransigent opposition to reform of any sort, Luther appealed to secular rulers to intervene and clear the way for ecclesiastical reform.

Kirsi I. Stjerna (Editor) Volker Leppin (Editor)
Release date: 
June 1, 2016

In autumn 1525, Luther wrote The Bondage of the Will as a response to humanist and theologian Erasmus of Rotterdam, who had criticized Luther’s teachings in the diatribe On Free Will. Luther’s argument on the matter of the bound and free will poses a challenge and an invitation for constructive contemporary theology.

Daniel Eppley (Author)
Release date: 
March 1, 2016

This study elucidates the hermeneutic of Richard Hooker, a formative figure of Anglicanism, to recommend it as a resource for promoting dialogue. 

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