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Reformation

15-21 of 127
Release date: 
July 15, 2017

Timothy J. Wengert provides detailed background into the development of Luther’s popular Small Catechism, which began with Luther’s early sermon series on the Ten Commandments, ...

Release date: 
April 1, 2017

Five hundred years ago the Protestant Reformation inspired profound theological, ecclesial, economic, and social transformations. But what impact does the Protestant tradition have today? And what might ...

Release date: 
March 1, 2017

Volume 5 of The Annotated Luther series features Luther's writings that intersect church and state, faith, and life lived as a follower of Christ. 

Release date: 
February 1, 2017

Remembering the Reformation presents a nuanced reading of Martin Luther and his relationship with the Catholic tradition. 

Release date: 
January 1, 2017

As profound as Martin Luther's ideas are, this giant of church history was concerned above all with practical instruction for daily Christian living. Harvesting Martin Luther's Reflections highlights this concern of Luther, mining his thought in key areas of doctrine, ethics, and church practice. Gathering noteworthy contributions by well-known Luther scholars from Europe and the Americas, this book ranges broadly over theological questions about baptism and righteousness, ethical issues like poverty and greed, and pastoral concerns like worship and spirituality.

Berndt Hamm (Author)
Release date: 
January 1, 2017

The development of Martin Luther's thought has commanded much scholarly attention because of the Reformation and its remarkable effects on the history of Christianity in the West. But much of that scholarship has been so enthralled by certain later debates that it has practically ignored and even distorted the context in and against which Luther's thought developed. In The Early Luther Berndt Hamm, armed with expertise both in late-medieval intellectual life and in Luther, presents new perspectives that leave old debates behind. 

Robert Kolb (Author)
Release date: 
January 1, 2017

Galvanized by Erasmus' teaching on free will, Martin Luther wrote De servo arbitrio, or The Bondage of the Will, insisting that the sinful human will could not turn itself to God. In this first study to investigate the sixteenth-century reception of De servo, Robert Kolb unpacks Luther's theology and recounts his followers' ensuing disputes until their resolution in the Lutheran churches' 1577 Formula of Concord. 

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