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Early Christianity/Patristics

43-49 of 65
Release date: 
July 1, 2014
In this book Whidden argues that illumination is a critical systematic motif in Aquinas?theology, one that involves the nature of truth, knowledge, and God; at the root, Aquinas?theology of light, or illumination, is Christological, grounding human knowledge of God and eschatological beatitude.
Peter T. Sanlon (Author)
Release date: 
July 1, 2014

How do the theological convictions that Augustine brought to his preaching challenge, sustain, or shape our work today? By presenting Augustine's thought on preaching to contemporary readers Sanlon contributes a major new piece to the ongoing reconsideration of preaching in the modern day.

Eric Eve (Author)
Release date: 
July 1, 2014

Behind the Gospels offers a general theoretical discussion of the nature of oral tradition and the formation of ancient texts and provides a critical survey of the field, from classical form-criticism down to the present day.

Release date: 
June 1, 2014
Although Basil of Caesarea was the first to write a discourse on the Holy Spirit, many scholars have since questioned if he fully believed in the Spirit's divinity. Timothy P. McConnell argues that Basil did regard the Spirit as fully divine and an equal Person of the Trinity.
M. David Litwa (Author)
Release date: 
March 1, 2014
What does it mean for Jesus to be "deified" in early Christian literature? M. David Litwa shows that at each stage in their depiction of Jesus' life and ministry, early Christian writings from the beginning relied on categories drawn not from Judaism alone, but on a wide, pan-Mediterranean understanding of deity.
Denis R. Janz (General Editor)
Release date: 
March 1, 2014

The essential material from A People's History of Christianity is available for classroom use covering topics from the Early Church to the Reformation.

Release date: 
March 1, 2014

The first comprehensive examination of John Chrysostom's view of the patriarch Abraham. Tonias reveals the ways in which Chrysostom used Abraham as a model of philosophical and Christian virtue, familial devotion, philanthropy, and obedient faith.

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