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Early Christianity/Patristics

22-28 of 66
Release date: 
September 1, 2016

Understandings of the Church explores the ways imagery is used by biblical writers and early Christian teachers such as Cyprian, Ignatius of Antioch, Tertullian, Clement of Alexandria, and Origen to describe the concept of church.

Ad Fontes: Early Christian Sources is a series designed to present ancient Christian texts essential to an understanding of Christian theology, ecclesiology, and practice. Developed in light of recent patristic scholarship for new generations of students of theology, the volumes will provide a representative sampling of theological contributions from both East and West.

Release date: 
August 1, 2016

Decades ago, Werner G. Kümmel described the historical problem of Romans as its "double character": concerned with issues of Torah and the destiny of Israel, the letter is explicitly addressed not to Jews but to Gentiles. At stake in the numerous answers given to that question is nothing less than. . . 

John T. Noble (Author)
Release date: 
May 1, 2016

Hagar and Ishmael are portrayed in ambivalent ways: dispossessed, yet protected; abandoned, yet given promises that rival those of the covenant with Abraham. John T. Noble argues that conventional characterizations of the Priestly writers' theology have failed to take into account the significance of these two "non-chosen" figures. Noble carefully examines their roles and depictions in Genesis and concludes that Ishmael is a key figure whose ambiguous status requires a rethinking of the goals and values of the Priestly work. 

Ben C. Blackwell (Editor) John K. Goodrich (Editor) Jason Maston (Editor)
Release date: 
May 1, 2016

Paul and the Apocalyptic Imagination brings together eminent Pauline scholars from diverse perspectives, along with experts of Second Temple Judaism, Hellenistic philosophy, patristics, and modern theology, to explore the contours of the current debate. Contributors discuss what apocalypticism, and an "apocalyptic Paul," have meant at different times; examine different aspects of Paul's thought and practice; and show how different implicit understandings of apocalypticism shape different contemporary presentations of the apostle’s significance.

Release date: 
May 1, 2016

Archaeologists have disputed the scarce evidence claimed for the presence of Christians in Pompeii before the catastrophic eruption of Mount Vesuvius in 79 CE. Now, Bruce W. Longenecker reviews that evidence in comparison with other possible data of first-century Christian presence elsewhere in the Mediterranean and reaches the conclusion that there were indeed Christians living in the doomed city. The Crosses of Pompeii presents an elegant case for their presence, with photographic illustration of the available archaeological evidence. 

Jared Ortiz (Author)
Release date: 
April 1, 2016

Challenging the common notion that Augustine’s Confessions lacks literary unity, “You Made Us for Yourself” approaches the Confessions in light of what Augustine himself would have considered most fundamental: creation, understood in a broad sense. Creation, for Augustine, is an epiphany, a light which reveals who God and man are. It is, Ortiz argues, the light within which Augustine wrote the Confessions and can account for the often despaired of meaning, structure, and unity of the Confessions

Matthew Baker (Editor) Mark Mourachian (Editor)
Release date: 
April 1, 2016

What Is the Bible? reopens a consideration of the doctrine of Scripture for contemporary theology, rooted in the tradition of the church Fathers (Greek, Latin, and Oriental)—an endeavor inspired by the theological vision of the twentieth century’s foremost Orthodox Christian theologian, Fr. Georges Florovsky. 

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