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Bible

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Sarah Harding (Author)
Release date: 
February 1, 2016

Sarah Harding examines Paul’s anthropology from the perspective of eschatology, concluding that his view of humans depends on his belief that the cosmos evolves through distinct aeons in progress towards its telos

Release date: 
December 18, 2015

The eighth-century BCE Isaiah of Jerusalem, the so-called First Isaiah, is one of the most important theological voices in the Bible. J. J. M. Roberts makes good use of his broad comparative knowledge of ancient Near Eastern historical and religious sources in providing a fresh and original interpretation of this prophet’s genuine oracles.

Release date: 
December 15, 2015

The first two chapters of 1 Corinthians have played a significant role in the history of Christian theology. Interpreting the central event in Christianity, the crucifixion of Jesus, Paul reflects on the wisdom and foolishness of God in the “word of the cross.” 

Release date: 
December 15, 2015

Applying criteria for the identification of biblical Hebrew poetry, Jason M. H. Gaines distinguishes a nearly complete poetic Priestly stratum in the Pentateuch ("Poetic-P"), coherent in literary, narrative, and ideological terms, from a later prose redaction ("Prosaic-P"), which is fragmentary, supplemental, and distinct in thematic and theological concern.

Joshua W. Jipp (Author)
Release date: 
December 1, 2015

Until recently, many scholars have read Paul’s use of the word Christos as more of a proper name (“Jesus Christ”) than a title, Jesus the Messiah. 

E. P. Sanders (Author)
Release date: 
December 1, 2015

E. P. Sanders offers an expansive introduction to the apostle, navigating some of the thorniest issues in scholarship in language accessible to the novice and seasoned scholar alike. 

James W. Barker (Author)
Release date: 
December 1, 2015

The relationship between John and the Synoptics is a perennial question, and Matthew has long been considered the least likely written source of the Fourth Gospel. In an ambitious reappraisal, James Barker demonstrates John’s use of Matthew. 

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