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Bible

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Release date: 
November 15, 2017

Young and Strickland analyze the four largest discourses of Jesus in Mark in the context of Greco-Roman rhetoric in an attempt to hear them as ...

Release date: 
November 15, 2017

The prophet Haggai advocated for the rebuilding of the temple, destroyed by Babylon, in the tumultuous period of reconstruction under Persian dominion; so much is ...

Susanne Scholz (Author)
Release date: 
October 15, 2017

Biblical studies and the teaching of biblical studies are clearly changing, though it is less clear what the changes mean and how we should evaluate them. Susanne Scholz casts a feminist eye on the politics of pedagogy, higher education, and wider society, decrypting important developments in “the architecture of educational power.” She also examines how the increasingly intercultural, interreligious, and diasporic dynamics in society inform the hermeneutical and methodological possibilities for biblical exegesis. Taken as a whole, the fourteen chapters demonstrate that the foregrounding of gender, placed into its intersectional contexts, offers intriguing and valuable alternative ways of seeing the world and the Bible’s place in it.

E. P. Sanders (Author)
Release date: 
October 15, 2017

This landmark work, which has shaped a generation of scholarship, compares the apostle Paul with contemporary Judaism, both understood on their own terms. E. P. ...

Release date: 
October 1, 2017

Paul’s letter to the Philippians offers treasures to the reader—and historical and theological puzzles as well. Paul A. Holloway treats the letter as a literary ...

Mothy Varkey (Author)
Release date: 
September 1, 2017

Salvation in Continuity deals with big questions––soteriology, intertwined with Christology––of utmost significance for understanding Matthew in its first-century Jewish setting. It argues that Matthew’s understanding of salvation in continuity is to be seen as his response to the historical and theological questions of post 70 c.e. Judaism. The study employs a sequential treatment of the Gospel, which enables it to avoid the danger which characterizes many previous studies of limiting the discussion of salvation in Matthew to certain texts, where the theme of salvation is more direct and explicit.

Release date: 
September 1, 2017

Recent scholarship has postulated "hidden criticism" in the letters of the apostle. But how can we decide, in a methodologically sound way, whether such a counter-imperial message lies beneath the surface of the text? Christoph Heilig suggests several analytical steps for examining this paradigm and concludes that the hypothesis that we can identify critical "echoes" of the Roman Empire in Paul’s letters needs to be modified if it is to be maintained. He encourages a reevaluation of Pauline passages in light of Paul’s engagement with ideas from his Roman environment. 

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