You are here

Hebrew Bible/Old Testament

57-63 of 262
Brian R. Doak (Author)
Release date: 
November 1, 2014

Brian R. Doak observes that the book of Job, more than any other book in the Bible, uses metaphors drawn from the natural world, especially of plants and animals, as raw material for thinking about human suffering. Doak argues that Job should be viewed as an anthropological "ground zero" for the traumatic definition of the post-exilic human self in ancient Israel.

Release date: 
October 1, 2014

This commentary on the Old Testament and Apocrypha presents a balanced synthesis of current scholarship, enabling readers to interpret Scripture for a complex and pluralistic world. The result is a commentary that is comprehensive and useful for preaching, teaching, and research.

Release date: 
October 1, 2014

This accessible volume includes modern general studies of Galilee and of Galilean history, as well as specialized studies on taxation, ethnicity, religious practices, road systems, trade and markets, education, health, village life, houses, and the urban-rural divide.

Release date: 
September 1, 2014

In this book Peterson engages one of the most enduring controversies in current critical scholarship on the Hebrew Bible, the identities and provenances of the authors of the various "editions" of the Deuteronomistic History.

Release date: 
July 1, 2014

The author argues that attention to narrative obtrusion in the Hebrew Bible offers an entry point into the world of the narrator and thus promises to redefine aspects of narrative criticism.

Marc H. Ellis (Author)
Release date: 
May 1, 2014
The new situation of contemporary prophetic challenges the fixed religious landscape of Judaism by reversing traditional boundaries, eschewing power and privilege, and brokering peace through solidarity and common struggle in ecumenical and interfaith contexts.
Release date: 
April 1, 2014

James H. Charlesworth gathers essays from world-renowned archaeologists and biblical scholars to address the current state of knowledge and to consider anew vital questions about the temple's significance for Jesus, for his followers, and for New Testament readers today.

Pages