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Hebrew Bible/Old Testament

50-56 of 269
Release date: 
March 1, 2015

Examining the different accounts of Hezekiah's reign in 2 Kings, 2 Chronicles, and Isaiah, Song-Mi Suzie Park describes a "Hezekiah complex" in which the king served as a symbol for the vicissitudes of Judah's history.

Release date: 
March 1, 2015

By examining the narrative techniques used in the Deuteronomistic History to portray Israel's kings, Joseph offers a deepened understanding of the worldview and theology of this important biblical work.

Maia Kotrosits (Author)
Release date: 
February 1, 2015
Maia Kotrosits challenges the contemporary notion of "early Christian literature," showing that a number of texts usually so described are not particularly interested? in a distinctive Christian identity. By appealing to trauma studies and diaspora theory and giving careful attention to the dynamics within these texts, she shows that this sample of writings offers complex reckonings with chaotic diasporic conditions and the transgenerational trauma of colonial violence.
Michael J. Kok (Author)
Release date: 
February 1, 2015

Michael J. Kok surveys the second-century reception of Mark, from Papias of Hierapolis to Clement of Alexandria, and finds that the patristic writers were hesitant to embrace Mark because they perceived it to be too easily adapted to rival Christian factions. Kok describes the story of Mark's Petrine origins as a second-century move to assert ownership of the Gospel on the part of the emerging Orthodox Church.

Mark A. Jason (Author)
Release date: 
February 1, 2015

Mark A. Jason offers a detailed investigation of the place of repentance in the Dead Sea Scrolls, addressing a significant lacuna in Qumran scholarship. Jason establishes the importance of repentance as a fundamental way of structuring and describing religious experience within the Qumran community, lacuna, Pseudepigrapha, daily life in ancient Judea

Mark D. Nanos (Editor) Magnus Zetterholm (Editor)
Release date: 
January 1, 2015
These chapters explore a number of issues in the contemporary study of Paul raised by questing what it means to read Paul from within Judaism? rather than supposing that he left the practice and promotion of living Jewishly behind after his discovery of Jesus as Christ (Messiah). This is a different question to those which have driven the "New Perspective" over the last thirty years, which still operates from many traditional assumptions about Paul's motives and behavior, viewing them as inconsistent with and critical of Judaism.
Ronald Charles (Author)
Release date: 
November 1, 2014

It is a commonplace today that Paul was a Jew of the Hellenistic Diaspora, but how does that observation help us to understand his thinking, his self-identification, and his practice? Ronald Charles applies the insights of contemporary diaspora studies to address much-debated questions about Paul's identity as a diaspora Jew.

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