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Historical Writings

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John J. Collins (Author)
Release date: 
April 1, 2018

Third Edition Coming April 2018!
A leading introduction to the Hebrew Bible

John J. Collins’s A Short Introduction to the Hebrew Bible is one ...

Release date: 
August 15, 2017

In this groundbreaking work to identify and address God’s absence in three key rape narratives in the Hebrew Bible, Leah Rediger Schulte finds a pattern ...

John J. Collins (Author)
Release date: 
June 1, 2017

John J. Collins’s Introduction to the Hebrew Bible is one of the most popular introductory textbooks in colleges and seminary classrooms. Enriched by decades of ...

John J. Collins (Author)
Release date: 
June 1, 2017

John J. Collins’s Introduction to the Hebrew Bible is one of the most popular introductory textbooks in colleges and seminary classrooms. Enriched by decades of ...

Release date: 
September 1, 2016

This commentary on the Historical Writings, excerpted from the Fortress Commentary on the Bible: The Old Testament and Apocrypha, engages readers in the work of biblical interpretation. Contributors from a rich diversity of perspectives connect historical-critical analysis with sensitivity to current theological, cultural, and interpretive issues.

Each chapter (Joshua through Esther) includes an introduction and commentary based on three lenses: ancient context, the interpretative tradition, and contemporary questions and challenges.

The Historical Writings introduces fresh perspectives and draws students, preachers, and interested readers into the challenging work of interpretation. 

Release date: 
June 1, 2016

Current scholarly debate over the historical character of David's rule generally considers the biblical portrait to represent David as king of Judah first, and subsequently ...

John T. Noble (Author)
Release date: 
May 1, 2016

Hagar and Ishmael are portrayed in ambivalent ways: dispossessed, yet protected; abandoned, yet given promises that rival those of the covenant with Abraham. John T. Noble argues that conventional characterizations of the Priestly writers' theology have failed to take into account the significance of these two "non-chosen" figures. Noble carefully examines their roles and depictions in Genesis and concludes that Ishmael is a key figure whose ambiguous status requires a rethinking of the goals and values of the Priestly work. 

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